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  • Get 72% off NordVPN Virtual Private Network Service For a Limited Time - Deal Alert
    DealPost Team

    NordVPN gives you a private and fast path through the public Internet. All of your data is protected every step of the way using revolutionary 2048-bit SSL encryption even a supercomputer can’t crack. Access Hulu, Netflix, BBC, ITV, Sky, RaiTV and much more from anywhere in the world. Unmetered access for 6 simultaneous devices. You're sure to find dozens of good uses for a VPN. Take advantage of the current 72% off deal that makes all of this available to you for just $3.29/month (access deal here). This is a special deal available for a limited time.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • How to protect yourself from ATM crime
    Mike Elgan

    The ATM card is dead. Or is it?

    Starting Monday, all 13,000 Wells Fargo ATMs will enable you to withdraw money without using your card, according to Jonathan Velline, head of Wells Fargo ATM and branch strategy.

    It works like this: Open the Wells Fargo app on your phone. Tap a button in the app for a temporary eight-digit code. Then enter the code, followed by your PIN, to access your account.

    Wells Fargo is the first major U.S. bank to offer app-based access to all of its ATMs.

    Citigroup, Chase and Bank of America and others are working on similar ATM functions, with only some machines already upgraded.

    wellsfargo atm code Wells Fargo

    Wells Fargo will enable ATM access without a card via a temporary eight-digit code accessible in its mobile app.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • CIA, WikiLeaks and Doctor Who?

    CSO Online's Steve Ragan and Joan Goodchild chat about the hot security news of the week, including their take on the recent WikiLeaks revelations around the CIA, and how Cisco, Samsung and Apple have responded to the information.

    click to view

  • Apple: Macs and iPhones are safe from newly revealed CIA exploits
    Lucian Constantin

    The Mac and iPhone exploits described in new documents attributed to the CIA were patched years ago, according to Apple.

    WikiLeaks released a new set of files Thursday that supposedly came from the CIA. They contain details about the agency’s alleged malware and attack capabilities against iPhones and Mac computers.

    The documents, dated 2012 and earlier, describe several “implants” that the CIA can install in the low-level extensible firmware interface (EFI) of Mac laptop and desktop computers. These EFI rootkits allow the agency's macOS spying malware to persist even after the OS is reinstalled.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Google Play faces cat-and-mouse game with Android malware
    Michael Kan

    What’s the best way to avoid Android malware? Downloading all your apps from the Google Play store -- where software is vetted – is perhaps the best advice.  

    But that doesn’t mean Google Play is perfect.

    Security researchers do find new Android malware lurking on Google’s official app store. That’s because hackers are coming up with sneaky ways to infiltrate the platform, despite the vetting processes that protect it.

    "Eventually, every wall can be breached," said Daniel Padon, a researcher at mobile security provider Check Point.

    To be sure, most Android users will probably never encounter malware on the Google Play store. Last year, the amount of malicious software that reached the platform amounted to only 0.16 percent of all apps, according to a new report from Google.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • To punish Symantec, Google may distrust a third of the web's SSL certificates
    Lucian Constantin

    Google is considering a harsh punishment for repeated incidents in which Symantec or its certificate resellers improperly issued SSL certificates. A proposed plan is to force the company to replace all of its customers’ certificates and to stop recognizing the extended validation (EV) status of those that have it.

    According to a Netcraft survey from 2015, Symantec is responsible for about one in every three SSL certificates used on the web, making it the largest commercial certificate issuer in the world. As a result of acquisitions over the years the company now controls the root certificates of several formerly standalone certificate authorities including VeriSign, GeoTrust, Thawte and RapidSSL.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • FBI director floats international framework on encrypted data access
    Michael Kan

    FBI director James Comey has suggested that an international agreement between governments could ease fears about IT products with government-mandated backdoors, but privacy advocates are doubtful.

    Speaking on Thursday, Comey suggested that the U.S. might work with other countries on a “framework” for creating legal access to encrypted tech devices.

    “I could imagine a community of nations committed to the rule of law developing a set of norms, a framework, for when government access is appropriate,” he said on Thursday.

    Comey made his comments at the University of Texas at Austin, when trying to address a key concern facing U.S. tech firms in the encryption debate: the fear that providing government access to their products might dampen their business abroad.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Leaked iCloud credentials came from third parties, Apple says
    Lucian Constantin

    A group of hackers threatening to wipe data from Apple devices attached to millions of iCloud accounts didn't obtain whatever log-in credentials they have through a breach of the company's services, Apple said.

    "There have not been any breaches in any of Apple's systems including iCloud and Apple ID," an Apple representative said in an emailed statement. "The alleged list of email addresses and passwords appears to have been obtained from previously compromised third-party services."

    A group calling itself the Turkish Crime Family claims to have login credentials for more than 750 million icloud.com, me.com and mac.com email addresses, and the group says more than 250 million of those credentials provide access to iCloud accounts that don't have two-factor authentication turned on.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Google: Half of Android devices haven’t been patched in a year or more
    Gregg Keizer

    Google engineers yesterday acknowledged that half of all Android devices had not received a security update in the past year, even as they argued that the firm has made progress in streamlining the open-source operating system's patching process.

    "About half of devices in use at the end of 2016 had not received a platform security update in the previous year," Adrian Ludwig and Mel Mille, members of the Android security team, said in a post to a company blog.

    Although Google has issued monthly security updates for Android since 2015 -- and deploys those patches to Nexis and Pixel devices as soon as they're available -- other device makers often take weeks or months to push updates to customers, or never do. Android's update problem is not new -- it's been in stark contrast to other operating systems, notably iOS, macOS and Windows, since Android's inception -- and is baked into the relationship between Google and the hardware manufacturers who build and sell phones.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Newly leaked documents show low-level CIA Mac and iPhone hacks
    Lucian Constantin

    The CIA has had tools to infect Apple Mac computers by connecting malicious Thunderbolt Ethernet adapters to them since 2012, according to new documents purported to be from the agency and published by WikiLeaks.

    One of the documents, dated Nov. 29, 2012, is a manual from the CIA's Information Operations Center on the use of a technology codenamed Sonic Screwdriver. It is described as "a mechanism for executing code on peripheral devices while a Mac laptop or desktop is booting."

    Sonic Screwdriver allows the CIA to modify the firmware of an Apple Thunderbolt-to-Ethernet adapter so that it forces a Macbook to boot from an USB stick or DVD disc even when its boot options are password protected.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Senate votes to kill FCC's broadband privacy rules
    Grant Gross

    The U.S. Senate has voted to kill broadband provider privacy regulations prohibiting them from selling customers' web-browsing histories and other data without their permission.

    The Senate's 50-48 vote Thursday on a resolution of disapproval would roll back Federal Communications Commission rules requiring broadband providers to receive opt-in customer permission to share sensitive personal information, including web-browsing history, geolocation, and financial details with third parties. The FCC approved the regulations just five months ago.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Snowden's ex-boss offers advice on stopping insider threats
    Michael Kan

    Steven Bay, a former defense contractor, knows a thing or two about insider threats. For a brief period, he was the boss of Edward Snowden, the famous leaker who stole sensitive files from the U.S. National Security Agency.

    Recalling the day he learned Snowden had been behind the NSA leaks back in June 2013, Bay said he received texts about the breaking news while in a leadership meeting at a church. The first text said "Sorry man, looks like your worst nightmare came true."

    Bay was crushed: "I went out into an empty room of the church and I just melted down crying."

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Look before you leap: 4 hard truths about IoT
    Stephen Lawson

    Most technologies go through a stage when everything seems possible. Personal computers in the early 1980s, the internet in the late 1990s and mobile apps around the beginning of this decade were like that.

    But so was the first unboxing of a Galaxy Note 7. In time, either suddenly or gradually, reality sets in.

    The internet of things still looks promising, with vendors and analysts forecasting billions of connected devices that will solve all sorts of problems in homes and enterprises. But the seams are starting to show on this one, too. As promising as the technology is, it has some shortcomings. Here are a few.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • LastPass fixes serious password leak flaws
    Lucian Constantin

    Developers of the popular LastPass password manager rushed to push out a fix to solve a serious vulnerability that could have allowed attackers to steal users' passwords or execute malicious code on their computers.

    The vulnerability was discovered by Google security researcher Tavis Ormandy and was reported to LastPass on Monday. It affected the browser extensions installed by the service's users for Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox and Microsoft Edge.

    According to a description in the Google Project Zero bug tracker, the vulnerability could have given attackers access to internal commands inside the LastPass extension. Those are the commands used by the extension to copy passwords or fill in web forms using information stored in the user's secure vault.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • iPhone, Mac owners: How to stymie hackers extorting Apple, threatening to wipe devices
    Gregg Keizer

    Hackers claiming to have hundreds of millions of iCloud credentials have threatened to wipe date from iPhones, iPads and Macs if Apple does not fork over $150,000 within two weeks.

    "This group is known for getting accounts and credentials, they have gotten credentials in the past," said Lamar Bailey, director of security research and development at Tripwire, of the purported hackers. "But whether they have that many ... who knows?"

    There's another reason for not panicking, Bailey said: People can quickly make their accounts more secure, assuming the criminals have only collected, not actually compromised the iCloud accounts by changing millions of passwords.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Google cites progress in Android security, but patching issues linger
    Michael Kan

    The chances of your encountering malware on your Android phone is incredibly small, according to Google.

    By the end of last year, less than 0.71 percent of Android devices had installed a "potentially harmful application," such as spyware, a Trojan, or other malicious software.

    That figure was even lower, at 0.05 percent, for Android phones that downloaded apps exclusively from the Google Play store.

    The internet giant revealed the figures in a new report detailing its efforts to making the Android OS secure. Thanks to better app review systems, the company is detecting and cracking down on more malware.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Hackers demand $150K ransom, threaten to wipe millions of Apple devices
    Lucian Constantin

    A group of hackers is threatening to wipe data from millions of Apple devices in two weeks if the company doesn’t pay them US$150,000.

    The group, which calls itself Turkish Crime Family, claims to have login credentials for more than 627 million icloud.com, me.com and mac.com email addresses. These are email domains that Apple has allowed for users creating iCloud accounts over the years.

    Even though the Turkish Crime Family hasn't been in the media spotlight before, its members claim that they've been involved in selling stolen online databases in private circles for the past few years.

    The group said via email that it has had a database of about 519 million iCloud credentials for some time, but did not attempt to sell it until now. The interest for such accounts on the black market has been low due to security measures Apple has put in place in recent years, it said.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • U.S. lawmakers question police use of facial recognition tech
    Grant Gross

    Reacting to concerns about the mass collection of photographs in police databases, U.S. lawmakers plan to introduce legislation to limit the use of facial recognition technology by the FBI and other law enforcement organizations.

    The FBI and police departments across the country can search a group of databases containing more than 400 million photographs, many of them from the drivers' licenses of people who have never committed a crime. The photos of more than half of U.S adults are contained in a series of FBI and state databases, according to one study released in October.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Password-stealing flaws in LastPass Chrome and Firefox extensions
    Darlene Storm

    Tavis Ormandy, a security researcher on Google’s Project Zero team, warned of flaws in LastPass browser extensions, vulnerabilities which – if a person surfed to a malicious site – would allow the malicious site to steal passwords from the password manager.

    LastPass said it patched the vulnerability in its Chrome extension and said it is working on a fix for the flaw in its Firefox add-on.

    Ormandy originally said the LastPass bug affected 4.1.42 Chrome and Firefox browser extensions. He developed a working exploit for a Windows box running the LastPass Chrome extension, but said it “could be made to work on other platforms.” He sent the details to LastPass before adding:

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Security Sessions: Where is VC security funding going?

    In the latest episode of Security Sessions, CSO Editor-in-Chief Joan Goodchild sits down with Jeff Fagnan from Accomplice, a venture capital and private equity firm in Cambridge, Mass. The two discuss the current state of VC funding in security companies and where the money is going (and not going), and why CSOs should "follow the money."

    click to view

  • UK follows U.S. ban of electronic devices in cabins on some flights
    Michael Kan

    The U.K. is joining the U.S. in its ban restricting passengers from bringing some electronic devices onto flights from the Middle East.

    Phones, laptops, and tablets that are larger than 16 cm (6.3 inches) in length and wider than 9.3 cm will no longer be allowed in the cabin on select flights coming from several Middle Eastern countries, the U.K.'s department of transportation said on Tuesday. 

    The U.K. said it was in "close contact" with the U.S. since the country announced its own ban on Monday.  However, the U.K. made no mention of any specific risk, only that it faces "evolving" terrorism threats. 

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Flaws in Moodle CMS put thousands of e-learning websites at risk
    Lucian Constantin

    Organizations that use the popular Moodle learning management system should deploy the latest patches as soon as possible because they fix vulnerabilities that could allow attackers to take over web servers.

    Moodle is an open source platform used by schools, universities, and other organizations to set up websites with interactive online courses. It's used by more than 78,000 e-learning websites from 234 countries that together have more than 100 million users.

    A week ago the Moodle developers released updates for the still supported branches of the platform: 3.2.2, 3.1.5, 3.0.9 and 2.7.19. The release notes mentioned that "a number of security related issues were resolved," but didn't provide any additional details about their nature or impact.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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| Date published: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 02:10:32 -0700
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Headlines

»CVE-2013-6446
The JobHistory Server in Cloudera CDH 4.x before 4.6.0 and 5.x before 5.0.0 Beta 2, when using MRv2/ ...
»CVE-2014-0229
Apache Hadoop 0.23.x before 0.23.11 and 2.x before 2.4.1, as used in Cloudera CDH 5.0.x before 5.0.2 ...
»CVE-2014-7279
The Konke Smart Plug K does not require authentication for TELNET sessions, which allows remote atta ...
»CVE-2014-8731
PHPMemcachedAdmin 1.2.2 and earlier allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary PHP code via vector ...
»CVE-2014-9832 (imagemagick)
Heap overflow in ImageMagick 6.8.9-9 via a crafted pcx file.
»CVE-2014-9833 (imagemagick)
Heap overflow in ImageMagick 6.8.9-9 via a crafted psd file.
»CVE-2014-9834 (imagemagick)
Heap overflow in ImageMagick 6.8.9-9 via a crafted pict file.
»CVE-2014-9835 (imagemagick)
Heap overflow in ImageMagick 6.8.9-9 via a crafted wpf file.
»CVE-2014-9836 (imagemagick)
ImageMagick 6.8.9-9 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service via a crafted xpm file.
»CVE-2014-9838 (imagemagick)
magick/cache.c in ImageMagick 6.8.9-9 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (crash).
»CVE-2014-9839 (imagemagick)
magick/colormap-private.h in ImageMagick 6.8.9-9 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of servic ...
»CVE-2014-9840 (imagemagick)
ImageMagick 6.8.9-9 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (out-of-bounds access) via ...
»CVE-2014-9915 (imagemagick)
Off-by-one error in ImageMagick before 6.6.0-4 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service ...
»CVE-2014-9939 (binutils)
ihex.c in GNU Binutils before 2.26 contains a stack buffer overflow when printing bad bytes in Intel ...
»CVE-2015-0855
The _mediaLibraryPlayCb function in mainwindow.py in pitivi before 0.95 allows attackers to execute ...


Date published: 2017-03-26T05:00:01Z
Details

»Apple Releases Security Update for iTunes
Original release date: March 24, 2017 Apple has released a security update for Apple iTunes t ...
»Aviation Phishing Scams
Original release date: March 23, 2017 US-CERT has received reports of email-based phishing ca ...
»Cisco Releases Security Updates
Original release date: March 22, 2017 Cisco has released security updates to address vulnerab ...
»Vulnerabilities Identified in Network Time Protocol Daemon (ntpd)
Original release date: March 22, 2017 The Network Time Foundation's NTP Project has has relea ...
»Cisco Releases Security Updates
Original release date: March 21, 2017 Cisco has released security updates to address vulnerab ...
»IRS Warns of Last-Minute Tax Scams
Original release date: March 17, 2017 The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has released an aler ...
»Mozilla Releases Security Updates
Original release date: March 17, 2017 Mozilla has released security updates to address a vuln ...
»Microsoft Ending Support for Windows Vista
Original release date: March 17, 2017 All software products have a lifecycle. After April 11, ...
»Microsoft SMBv1 Vulnerability
Original release date: March 16, 2017 Microsoft has released a security update to address a v ...
»Cisco Releases Security Updates
Original release date: March 15, 2017 Cisco has released several updates to address vulnerabi ...


Date published: not known
Details

»Mostly blocked, but still good enough: Necurs sending pump-and-dump spam
The Necurs botnet has started sending pump-and-dump spam. Almost al ...
»Why the SHA-1 collision means you should stop using the algorithm
Realistically speaking, if your software or system uses the SHA-1 h ...
»VB2017 Call for Papers: frequently asked questions
The call for papers for VB2017, which takes place 4 to 6 October i ...
»Throwback Thursday: Michelangelo - Graffiti Not Art
This week marked the 25th anniversary of the trigger date of the in ...
»How are you defending your network? Come and tell us at VB2017!
Is it your job to defend your company’s network? Are you defending ...
»Quick impressions from BSides Budapest
At Virus Bulletin, we love the BSides concept and we have attended ...
»First sponsors of VB2017 announced
We are excited to announce the first five sponsors of VB2017, compa ...
»Security products and HTTPS: let's do it better
A recent paper showed that many HTTPS-intercepting security solutio ...
»The SHA-1 hashing algorithm has been 'shattered'
Researchers from Google and CWI Amsterdam have created the first kn ...


Date published: not known
Details
Main Menu
· Home
Current Security News
 
US-CERT Current Activity

» Apple Releases Security Update for iTunes
[24 Mar 2017 12:07pm]

» Aviation Phishing Scams
[23 Mar 2017 02:27pm]

» Cisco Releases Security Updates
[22 Mar 2017 04:02pm]

» Vulnerabilities Identified in Network Time Protocol Daemon (ntpd)
[22 Mar 2017 11:20am]

» Cisco Releases Security Updates
[21 Mar 2017 09:57am]

» IRS Warns of Last-Minute Tax Scams
[17 Mar 2017 09:21pm]

» Mozilla Releases Security Updates
[17 Mar 2017 06:54pm]

» Microsoft Ending Support for Windows Vista
[16 Mar 2017 10:45pm]

» Microsoft SMBv1 Vulnerability
[16 Mar 2017 04:12pm]

» Cisco Releases Security Updates
[15 Mar 2017 06:26pm]

***
US-CERT Alerts

» TA17-075A: HTTPS Interception Weakens TLS Security
[16 Mar 2017 06:40am]

» TA16-336A: Avalanche (crimeware-as-a-service infrastructure)
[30 Nov 2016 10:00pm]

» TA16-288A: Heightened DDoS Threat Posed by Mirai and Other Botnets
[14 Oct 2016 05:59pm]

» TA16-250A: The Increasing Threat to Network Infrastructure Devices and Recommended Mitigations
[06 Sep 2016 04:29pm]

» TA16-187A: Symantec and Norton Security Products Contain Critical Vulnerabilities
[05 Jul 2016 08:50am]

» TA16-144A: WPAD Name Collision Vulnerability
[23 May 2016 05:38am]

» TA16-132A: Exploitation of SAP Business Applications
[11 May 2016 05:31am]

» TA16-105A: Apple Ends Support for QuickTime for Windows; New Vulnerabilities Announced
[14 Apr 2016 01:48pm]

» TA16-091A: Ransomware and Recent Variants
[31 Mar 2016 04:00pm]

» TA15-337A: Dorkbot
[03 Dec 2015 04:40pm]

***
Computerworld Security

» Get 72% off NordVPN Virtual Private Network Service For a Limited Time - Deal Alert
[25 Mar 2017 06:37pm]

» How to protect yourself from ATM crime
[25 Mar 2017 05:00am]

» CIA, WikiLeaks and Doctor Who?
[24 Mar 2017 03:55pm]

» Apple: Macs and iPhones are safe from newly revealed CIA exploits
[24 Mar 2017 01:11pm]

» Google Play faces cat-and-mouse game with Android malware
[24 Mar 2017 12:16pm]

» To punish Symantec, Google may distrust a third of the web's SSL certificates
[24 Mar 2017 11:32am]

» FBI director floats international framework on encrypted data access
[23 Mar 2017 04:21pm]

» Leaked iCloud credentials came from third parties, Apple says
[23 Mar 2017 03:13pm]

» Google: Half of Android devices haven’t been patched in a year or more
[23 Mar 2017 01:41pm]

» Newly leaked documents show low-level CIA Mac and iPhone hacks
[23 Mar 2017 12:53pm]

» Senate votes to kill FCC's broadband privacy rules
[23 Mar 2017 11:13am]

» Snowden's ex-boss offers advice on stopping insider threats
[23 Mar 2017 11:10am]

» Look before you leap: 4 hard truths about IoT
[23 Mar 2017 06:21am]

» LastPass fixes serious password leak flaws
[22 Mar 2017 03:21pm]

» iPhone, Mac owners: How to stymie hackers extorting Apple, threatening to wipe devices
[22 Mar 2017 02:23pm]

***
Microsoft Security Advisories

» 3123479 - SHA-1 Hashing Algorithm for Microsoft Root Certificate Program - Version: 2.0
[14 Mar 2017 11:00am]

» 4010983 - Vulnerability in ASP.NET Core MVC 1.1.0 Could Allow Denial of Service - Version: 1.0
[27 Jan 2017 11:00am]

» 3214296 - Vulnerabilities in Identity Model Extensions Token Signing Verification Could Allow Elevation of Privilege - Version: 1.0
[10 Jan 2017 11:00am]

» 3181759 - Vulnerabilities in ASP.NET Core View Components Could Allow Elevation of Privilege - Version: 1.0
[13 Sep 2016 11:00am]

» 3174644 - Updated Support for Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange - Version: 1.0
[13 Sep 2016 11:00am]

» 3179528 - Update for Kernel Mode Blacklist - Version: 1.0
[09 Aug 2016 11:00am]

» 2880823 - Deprecation of SHA-1 Hashing Algorithm for Microsoft Root Certificate Program - Version: 2.0
[18 May 2016 11:00am]

» 3155527 - Update to Cipher Suites for FalseStart - Version: 1.0
[10 May 2016 11:00am]

» 3152550 - Update to Improve Wireless Mouse Input Filtering - Version: 1.1
[22 Apr 2016 11:00am]

» 3137909 - Vulnerabilities in ASP.NET Templates Could Allow Tampering - Version: 1.1
[10 Feb 2016 11:00am]

» 2871997 - Update to Improve Credentials Protection and Management - Version: 5.0
[09 Feb 2016 11:00am]

» 3109853 - Update to Improve TLS Session Resumption Interoperability - Version: 1.0
[12 Jan 2016 11:00am]

» 3118753 - Updates for ActiveX Kill Bits 3118753 - Version: 1.0
[12 Jan 2016 11:00am]

» 2755801 - Update for Vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge - Version: 53.0
[05 Jan 2016 11:00am]

» 3123040 - Inadvertently Disclosed Digital Certificate Could Allow Spoofing - Version: 1.0
[08 Dec 2015 11:00am]

***
WIRED

» Security News This Week: FedEx Offered Customers Five Bucks to Re-Install Flash
[25 Mar 2017 05:00am]

» Instagram Has Two-Factor Authentication Now, So Turn It On
[23 Mar 2017 01:30pm]

» WikiLeaks Reveals How the CIA Can Hack a Mac’s Hidden Code
[23 Mar 2017 12:09pm]

» The Clever ‘DoubleAgent’ Attack Turns Antivirus Into Malware
[23 Mar 2017 09:33am]

» Don’t Buy the Latest Trump Surveillance Hype
[22 Mar 2017 04:18pm]

» Good News: Android’s Huge Security Problem Is Getting Less Huge
[22 Mar 2017 08:00am]

» A Cybersecurity Arsenal That’ll Help ‘Protect Your Election’
[21 Mar 2017 05:00am]

» Inside the Hunt for Russia’s Most Notorious Hacker
[21 Mar 2017 04:00am]

» Russia? Nah. The House GOP Goes After Leakers Instead
[20 Mar 2017 04:02pm]

» Trump’s TSA Budget Fails to Cut the Obvious: Air Marshals
[20 Mar 2017 12:00pm]

***
Network World Security

» Get 72% off NordVPN Virtual Private Network Service For a Limited Time - Deal Alert
[25 Mar 2017 06:37pm]

» Consultant urges never pay ransomware demands
[24 Mar 2017 03:40pm]

» Apple: Macs and iPhones are safe from newly revealed CIA exploits
[24 Mar 2017 12:58pm]

» IDG Contributor Network: 7 best practices for securing your cloud service
[24 Mar 2017 12:36pm]

» Review: Canary Flex security camera lives up to its name
[24 Mar 2017 07:01am]

» Smackdown: Office 365 vs. G Suite management
[16 Mar 2017 07:01am]

» Zix wins 5-vendor email encryption shootout
[13 Mar 2017 04:00am]

» Review: vArmour flips security on its head
[06 Mar 2017 03:50am]

» 5 open source security tools too good to ignore
[21 Feb 2017 07:12am]

» Review: Samsung SmartCam PT network camera
[15 Feb 2017 07:00am]

» Review: Arlo Pro cameras offer true flexibility for home security
[09 Feb 2017 07:01am]

» Face-off: Oracle vs. CA for identity management
[26 Jan 2017 10:30am]

» 6 steps to secure a home security camera
[23 Jan 2017 04:00am]

» CIA, WikiLeaks and Doctor Who?
[24 Mar 2017 03:55pm]

» Consultant urges never pay ransomware demands
[24 Mar 2017 03:40pm]

***


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