NIST Site Search
Search NIST.GOV
Custom Search
[Official NIST.GOV TIME]
Product Research

Advertise on this site
Newsfeeds
Computerworld Security
  • Customers roast Microsoft over security bulletins' demise
    Gregg Keizer

    When Microsoft asked customers last week for feedback on the portal that just replaced the decades-long practice of delivering detailed security bulletins, it got an earful from unhappy users.

    "Hate hate hate the new security bulletin format. HATE," emphasized Janelle 322 in a support forum where Microsoft urged customers to post thoughts on the change. "I now have to manually transcribe this information to my spreadsheet to disseminate to my customers. You have just added 8 hours to my workload. Thanks for nothing."

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • Researchers remotely kill the engine of a moving car by hacking vulnerable car dongle
    Darlene Storm

    Israeli firm Argus Cyber Security recently reported that it had been able to remotely “take control of a car via Bluetooth” thanks to vulnerabilities in the Bosch Drivelog Connect OBD-II dongle.

    While the hack wouldn’t affect 90 percent of cars and produce an army of “zombie cars” like was pulled off by cyber-terrorist Cipher (Charlize Theron) in the eighth installment of the Fast and Furious series, Argus researchers were able to remotely kill the engine of a moving car.

    Famed car-hacker Charlie Miller isn’t too worried about a Fate of the Furious type of car hacking at this point. Bad guys remotely taking control of cars by hacking may currently be something we only see done in the movies, but the CIA was interested in hacking cars for what WikiLeaks claimed could be used to pull off “nearly undetectable assassinations.” 

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • Russian man receives longest-ever prison sentence in the U.S. for hacking
    Lucian Constantin

    A 32-year-old Russian hacker was sentenced to 27 years in prison in the U.S. for stealing millions of payment card details from businesses by infecting their point-of-sale systems with malware.

    The sentence is the longest ever handed out in the U.S. for computer crimes, surpassing the 20-year jail term imposed on American hacker and former U.S. Secret Service informant Albert Gonzalez in 2010 for similar credit card theft activities.

    Roman Valeryevich Seleznev, a Russian citizen from Vladivostok, was sentenced Friday in the Western District of Washington after he was found guilty in August of 10 counts of wire fraud, eight counts of intentional damage to a protected computer, nine counts of obtaining information from a protected computer, nine counts of possession of 15 or more unauthorized access devices and two counts of aggravated identity theft.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • FAQ: What is blockchain and how can it help business?
    Lucas Mearian

    Blockchain sounds like a way to keep boats anchored, which isn't a bad analogy, considering what the technology purports to do.

    While some IT experts herald it as a groundbreaking way of creating a distributed, unchangeable record of transactions, others question the nascent technology's usefulness in the enterprise, which has traditionally relied on centrally administered databases to secure digital records.

    Even so, companies are moving fast to try and figure out how they can use it to save time and money. And IT vendors are responding to customers calls for information, with some already looking to include it as part of their services.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • There's now a tool to test for NSA spyware
    Michael Kan

    Has your computer been infected with a suspected NSA spying implant? A security researcher has come up with a free tool that can tell.

    Luke Jennings of security firm Countercept wrote a script in response to last week’s high-profile leak of cyberweapons that some researchers believe are from the National Security Agency. It's designed to detect an implant called Doublepulsar, which is delivered by many of the Windows-based exploits found in the leak and can be used to load other malware.

    The script, which requires some programming skill to use, is available for download on GitHub.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • Hackers use old Stuxnet-related bug to carry out attacks
    Michael Kan

    Users that run unpatched software beware. Hackers have been relying on an old software bug tied to the Stuxnet worm to carry out their attacks.

    Microsoft may have initially patched the flaw in 2010, but it's nevertheless become the most widespread software exploit, according to security firm Kaspersky Lab.

    On Thursday, Kaspersky posted research examining the use of exploits, or malicious programs designed to take advantage of certain software flaws. Once an exploit goes to work, it can typically pave the way for other malicious programs to install onto a computer.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • Developer lifts Windows 7's update blockade with unsanctioned patch
    Gregg Keizer

    An anonymous developer has published a patch that negates Microsoft's barring of security updates from Windows 7 and 8.1 PCs equipped with the very newest processors.

    The developer, identified as "Zeffy," posted the patch and accompanying documentation on GitHub, the code repository.

    "I was inspired to look into these new rollup updates that Microsoft released on March 16 [after reading about the processor-related blocking of Windows Update]," wrote Zeffy. "[That was] essentially a giant middle finger to anyone who dare not 'upgrade' to the steaming pile of garbage known as Windows 10."

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • DHS's ICS-CERT warns of BrickerBot: IoT malware that will brick vulnerable devices
    Darlene Storm

    Since the emergence of Mirai, you may have wondered if your IoT device has ever been infected with malware; you even may have rebooted the device which would remove the infection. But if your IoT device becomes infected with BrickerBot, you will know because the malware will “brick” it. Just the same, some people will believe the hardware failed.

    Radware security researchers previously said BrickerBot malware was responsible for permanent denial of service attacks (PDoS) that would “destroy” the infected devices. PDoS, also known as “phlashing,” is “an attack that damages a system so badly that it requires replacement or reinstallation of hardware. By exploiting security flaws or misconfigurations, this type of cyberattack can destroy the firmware and/or basic functions of system.”

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • Experts contend Microsoft canceled Feb. updates to patch NSA exploits
    Gregg Keizer

    Microsoft delayed its February security update slate to finish patching critical flaws in Windows that a hacker gang tried to sell, several security experts have argued.

    "Looks like Microsoft had been informed by 'someone,' and purposely delayed [February's] Patch Tuesday to successfully deliver MS17-010," tweeted Matt Suiche, founder of Dubai-based security firm Comae Technologies.

    MS17-010, one of several security bulletins Microsoft issued in March, was just one of several cited Friday by the Redmond, Wash., company when it said it had already patched most of the vulnerabilities exploited by just-leaked hacking tools.

    Those tools -- 12 different Windows exploits -- had been included in a large data dump made April 14 by a hacker group dubbed Shadow Brokers, which is believed to have ties to Russia. The exploits, as well as a trove of documents, had been stolen from the National Security Agency (NSA), Shadow Brokers claimed.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • How one personal cyber insurance policy stacks up
    Evan Schuman

    As cyber insurance slowly moves from corporate to consumer coverage, some interestingly comprehensive policies have been introduced. One, introduced this month by AIG, puts a strong emphasis on services to prevent attacks rather than merely paying for them once they happen. We decided to dive into the fine print to see how much wiggle room the insurer gave itself.

    The new policy, called Family CyberEdge, is designed as a supplement to existing homeowner’s insurance and will cost an extra $597 for $50,000 limits for each key area, consisting of cyber extortion, data restoration, crisis management and cyber bullying, with no deductibles beyond a flat $1,000 for data restoration. Bump the coverage limit up to $100,000 and the annual premium rises to $972, or go for the maximum coverage of $250,000 and the annual premium comes in at $1,723.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • IDG Contributor Network: Most of the Windows zero-day exploits have already been patched
    Andy Patrizio

    Late last week, a hacker group known as The Shadow Brokers released a trove of Windows exploits it claims to have obtained from National Security Agency's (NSA's) elite hacking team. The group released the tools and presentations and files claiming to detail the agency's methods of carrying out clandestine surveillance on Windows server software dating back to Windows XP and set off a mild panic for what was otherwise a slow Friday.

    There’s just one problem: Microsoft says it has already issued patches for the majority of exploits, with some of them coming out as recently last month. The MSRC team made a blog post on Friday, the same day Shadow Brokers released the exploits, pointing this out. It was a remarkably quick response.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • Microsoft confirms it's patched most of the NSA's Windows exploits
    Gregg Keizer

    Microsoft on Friday said it had patched most of the Windows vulnerabilities purportedly exploited by the National Security Agency (NSA) using tools that were leaked last week.

    The Windows flaws were disclosed by the hacking gang Shadow Brokers in a large data dump earlier Friday. The group has released several collections of documents about the internal operations of the NSA, and the code it allegedly has used to compromise computers and other devices worldwide.

    "Most of the exploits that were disclosed fall into vulnerabilities that are already patched in our supported products," Phillip Misner, a group manager in the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC), wrote in a post to a company blog.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • 1,175 hotels listed in payment card breach of Holiday Inn parent company
    Darlene Storm

    You may recall commercials for Holiday Inn Express that revolved around a “Stay smart” theme, but if you stayed in Holiday Inn Express, or other InterContinental Hotels Group-branded franchise hotel late last year, then you would be really smart if you keep an eye out for unexpected charges on your credit card.

    IHG finally reported the findings from an investigation into a breach of the company’s payment systems. The company has over 5,000 hotels across 100 counties, with brands such as Holiday Inn, Holiday Inn Resort, Holiday Inn Express, Crowne Plaza, Hotel Indigo, InterContinental, Kimpton, Staybridge Suites and Candlewood Suites. Hackers managed to get malware into the front desk payment system at some IHG-branded franchise hotels in the United States and Puerto Rico and made off with payment card data.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • Profiling 10 types of hackers
    Ryan Francis
    Different shapes and sizes
    01 hackers intro

    Image by Thinkstock

    Hackers, like the attacks they perpetrate, come in many forms, with motivations that range from monetary to political to ethical. Understanding the different types of hackers that exist and what motivates them can help you identify the attackers you are most susceptible to and properly defend yourself and your organization against cyberattacks. Travis Farral, director of security strategy at Anomali, outlines the top 10 types of hackers you should have on your radar.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • An introduction to six types of VPN software
    Michael Horowitz

    A VPN is simply an encrypted connection between two computers, each side running VPN software. The two sides, however, are not equal.

    The software that you, as the user of a VPN service deal with, is known as the VPN client. The software run by a VPN company is a VPN server. The encrypted connection always starts with a VPN client making a request to a VPN server.

    There are many different flavors of VPN connections, each with its own corresponding client and server software. The most popular flavors are probably L2TP/IPsec, OpenVPN, IKEv2 and PPTP.

    Some VPN providers support only one flavor, others are much more flexible. Astrill, for example, supports OpenWeb, OpenVPN, PPTP, L2TP, Cisco IPSec, IKEv2, SSTP, StealthVPN and RouterPro VPN. At the other extreme, OVPN, as their name implies, only supports OpenVPN.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • Honesty is not the best privacy policy
    Mike Elgan

    Digital privacy invasion is more than a theoretical or actual threat to our freedoms. It's also a huge distraction.

    Take MIT genius Steven Smith. He's recently taken time away from his specialties of radar, sonar, and signal processing at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory to automate the pollution of his family's web traffic with thousands of arbitrary searches and sites.

    His code essentially lies about internet activity to whomever is listening.

    The software is an artful liar. According to a piece in The Atlantic, Smith's algorithm uses web activity-spoofing software called PhantomJS to conduct searches in a way and on a timeline that mimics normal human online behavior.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • Microsoft begins denying updates to some Windows 7 users
    Gregg Keizer

    Microsoft this week began blocking Windows 7 and 8.1 PCs equipped with the very newest processors from receiving security updates, making good on a policy it announced but did not implement last year.

    But the company also refused to provide security fixes to Windows 7 systems that were powered by AMD's "Carrizo" CPUs, an architecture that was supposed to continue receiving patches.

    The decree that led to the update bans, whether allowable or not under Microsoft's new policy, was revealed in January 2016, when the company said making Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 run on the latest processors was "challenging." Microsoft then ruled that Windows 10 would be the only supported edition on seventh-generation and later CPUs and simultaneously dictated a substantial shortening of support of both editions.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • Quantum computing advances toward the enterprise
    Sharon Gaudin
     

    Quantum computing may still sound like the stuff of science fiction, but within the next 10 years, it could be a reality

    "Systems are still pretty rudimentary," said Charles King, an analyst with Pund-IT.  "Though they perform some specific kinds of calculations faster than traditional computers, they are defined by their limitations. When true, fully operable quantum systems come online, they will force the IT industry, public and private sector organizations and individuals to fundamentally rethink certain kinds of problems and all but abandon some conventional solutions."

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • IDG Contributor Network: Massive change to a moderate Patch Tuesday
    Greg Lambert

    Last month, we had the largest ever release of patches and updates from Microsoft.

    This month, we see the biggest change to Patch Tuesday since the first updates were released on the second Tuesday in October 2003, starting with MS03-041. Security bulletins with easy to follow formats like MSyy-xxx are no longer published by Microsoft as of April 2017.

    Now, we have the Microsoft Security Update Guide which is defined by Microsoft as the "authoritative source of information on our security updates." The MSUG is a searchable database of patches and updates that offers some basic queries and filtering. In addition to this database-driven approach, Microsoft has published summary release notes for April 2017 that can be found here. Helpfully, this summary outlines that the following technologies are updated for April:

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • 14% off APC 11-Outlet Surge Protector with USB Charging Ports and SurgeArrest - Deal Alert
    DealPost Team

    Be it a lightning strike that destroys a home entertainment center or consistently fluctuating power that degrades the performance and shortens the life of your electronics – surges, lightning, and other power disturbances can have a devastating impact on the valuable electronics you rely on every day. The P11U2 from APC offers guaranteed surge protection. Connect and protect up to 11 electronics, and conveniently charge your mobile devices via 2 additional USB ports. Installation is convenient and easy with a 180-degree rotating power cord and right-angle plug. Lastly, three LED indicators inform you if there is any overload, unit, or wall wiring issues. The P11U2 averages 4.5 out of 5 stars from over 1,500 people on Amazon (read reviews), where its typical list price of $34.99 is discounted 14% to $29.99. See this deal on Amazon.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

| Date published: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 16:51:04 -0700
Back to newsfeed list
Translate to: {GOOGLETRANS}
Google Ads




Headlines

»CVE-2007-6761
drivers/media/video/videobuf-vmalloc.c in the Linux kernel before 2.6.24 does not initialize videobu ...
»CVE-2010-1776
Find My iPhone on iOS 2.0 through 3.1.3 for iPhone 3G and later and iOS 2.1 through 3.1.3 for iPod t ...
»CVE-2010-5321
Memory leak in drivers/media/video/videobuf-core.c in the videobuf subsystem in the Linux kernel 2.6 ...
»CVE-2010-5329
The video_usercopy function in drivers/media/video/v4l2-ioctl.c in the Linux kernel before 2.6.39 re ...
»CVE-2011-3428
Buffer overflow in QuickTime before 7.7.1 for Windows allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary c ...
»CVE-2011-3438
WebKit, as used in Safari 5.0.6, allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (process crash ...
»CVE-2013-7463
The aescrypt gem 1.0.0 for Ruby does not randomize the CBC IV for use with the AESCrypt.encrypt and ...
»CVE-2014-9654
The Regular Expressions package in International Components for Unicode (ICU) for C/C++ before 2014- ...
»CVE-2014-9680
sudo before 1.8.12 does not ensure that the TZ environment variable is associated with a zoneinfo fi ...
»CVE-2014-9907 (imagemagick)
coders/dds.c in ImageMagick allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service via a crafted DDS f ...
»CVE-2015-0104
IBM Tivoli IT Asset Management for IT, Tivoli Service Request Manager, and Change and Configuration ...
»CVE-2015-0107
IBM Tivoli IT Asset Management for IT, Tivoli Service Request Manager, and Change and Configuration ...
»CVE-2015-1521
analyzer/protocol/dnp3/DNP3.cc in Bro before 2.3.2 does not properly handle zero values of a packet ...
»CVE-2015-1522
analyzer/protocol/dnp3/DNP3.cc in Bro before 2.3.2 does not reject certain non-zero values of a pack ...
»CVE-2015-7245
Directory traversal vulnerability in DLink DVGN5402SP with firmware W1000CN00, W1000CN03, or W2000EN00 allows remote attackers to read sensitive information via a .. (dot dot) in the errorpage parameter.


Date published: 2017-04-25T00:00:01Z
Details

»Drupal Releases Security Updates
Original release date: April 19, 2017 Drupal has released an advisory to address a vulnerabil ...
»Cisco Releases Security Updates
Original release date: April 19, 2017 Cisco has released updates to address several high-impa ...
»Mozilla Releases Security Updates
Original release date: April 19, 2017 Mozilla has released security updates to address a vuln ...
»Google Releases Security Updates for Chrome
Original release date: April 19, 2017 Google has released Chrome version 58.0.3029.81 for Win ...
»VMware Releases Security Updates
Original release date: April 18, 2017 VMware has released security updates to address vulnera ...
»Oracle Releases Security Bulletin
Original release date: April 18, 2017 Oracle has released its Critical Patch Update for April ...
»Microsoft Addresses Shadow Brokers Exploits
Original release date: April 15, 2017 | Last revised: April 17, 2017 The Microsoft Security R ...
»VMware Releases Security Updates
Original release date: April 14, 2017 VMware has released security updates to address a vulne ...
»ISC Releases Security Updates for BIND
Original release date: April 12, 2017 The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) has released upda ...
»Apache Software Foundation Releases Security Updates
Original release date: April 12, 2017 | Last revised: April 18, 2017 The Apache Foundation ha ...


Date published: not known
Details

»VB2016 paper: Debugging and monitoring malware network activities with Haka
In their VB2016 paper, Stormshield researchers Benoît Ancel and Meh ...
»VB2017: a wide ranging and international conference programme
We are proud to announce a very broad and very international progra ...
»John Graham-Cumming and Brian Honan to deliver keynote addresses at VB2017
Virus Bulletin is excited to announce John-Graham Cumming and Brian ...
»Virus Bulletin says a fond farewell to John Hawes
As VB's COO John Hawes moves on to new challenges, the team wish hi ...
»VB2016 paper: One-Click Fileless Infection
Symantec researchers Himanshu Anand and Chastine Menrige explain ho ...
»Mostly blocked, but still good enough: Necurs sending pump-and-dump spam
The Necurs botnet has started sending pump-and-dump spam. Almost al ...
»Why the SHA-1 collision means you should stop using the algorithm
Realistically speaking, if your software or system uses the SHA-1 h ...
»VB2017 Call for Papers: frequently asked questions
The call for papers for VB2017, which takes place 4 to 6 October i ...
»Throwback Thursday: Michelangelo - Graffiti Not Art
This week marked the 25th anniversary of the trigger date of the in ...


Date published: not known
Details
Main Menu
· Home
Current Security News
 
US-CERT Current Activity

» Drupal Releases Security Updates
[19 Apr 2017 06:17pm]

» Cisco Releases Security Updates
[19 Apr 2017 06:14pm]

» Mozilla Releases Security Updates
[19 Apr 2017 06:04pm]

» Google Releases Security Updates for Chrome
[19 Apr 2017 06:02pm]

» VMware Releases Security Updates
[18 Apr 2017 02:34pm]

» Oracle Releases Security Bulletin
[18 Apr 2017 02:30pm]

» Microsoft Addresses Shadow Brokers Exploits
[15 Apr 2017 07:09pm]

» VMware Releases Security Updates
[14 Apr 2017 04:13pm]

» ISC Releases Security Updates for BIND
[12 Apr 2017 08:19pm]

» Apache Software Foundation Releases Security Updates
[12 Apr 2017 12:11pm]

***
US-CERT Alerts

» TA17-075A: HTTPS Interception Weakens TLS Security
[16 Mar 2017 06:40am]

» TA16-336A: Avalanche (crimeware-as-a-service infrastructure)
[30 Nov 2016 10:00pm]

» TA16-288A: Heightened DDoS Threat Posed by Mirai and Other Botnets
[14 Oct 2016 05:59pm]

» TA16-250A: The Increasing Threat to Network Infrastructure Devices and Recommended Mitigations
[06 Sep 2016 04:29pm]

» TA16-187A: Symantec and Norton Security Products Contain Critical Vulnerabilities
[05 Jul 2016 08:50am]

» TA16-144A: WPAD Name Collision Vulnerability
[23 May 2016 05:38am]

» TA16-132A: Exploitation of SAP Business Applications
[11 May 2016 05:31am]

» TA16-105A: Apple Ends Support for QuickTime for Windows; New Vulnerabilities Announced
[14 Apr 2016 01:48pm]

» TA16-091A: Ransomware and Recent Variants
[31 Mar 2016 04:00pm]

» TA15-337A: Dorkbot
[03 Dec 2015 04:40pm]

***
Computerworld Security

» Customers roast Microsoft over security bulletins' demise
[24 Apr 2017 12:49pm]

» Researchers remotely kill the engine of a moving car by hacking vulnerable car dongle
[24 Apr 2017 10:54am]

» Russian man receives longest-ever prison sentence in the U.S. for hacking
[24 Apr 2017 09:17am]

» FAQ: What is blockchain and how can it help business?
[24 Apr 2017 04:01am]

» There's now a tool to test for NSA spyware
[22 Apr 2017 05:43am]

» Hackers use old Stuxnet-related bug to carry out attacks
[20 Apr 2017 02:57pm]

» Developer lifts Windows 7's update blockade with unsanctioned patch
[20 Apr 2017 02:28pm]

» DHS's ICS-CERT warns of BrickerBot: IoT malware that will brick vulnerable devices
[19 Apr 2017 09:21am]

» Experts contend Microsoft canceled Feb. updates to patch NSA exploits
[18 Apr 2017 02:06pm]

» How one personal cyber insurance policy stacks up
[18 Apr 2017 05:00am]

» IDG Contributor Network: Most of the Windows zero-day exploits have already been patched
[17 Apr 2017 01:46pm]

» Microsoft confirms it's patched most of the NSA's Windows exploits
[17 Apr 2017 01:05pm]

» 1,175 hotels listed in payment card breach of Holiday Inn parent company
[17 Apr 2017 11:11am]

» Profiling 10 types of hackers
[17 Apr 2017 05:00am]

» An introduction to six types of VPN software
[15 Apr 2017 04:44pm]

***
Microsoft Security Advisories

» 3123479 - SHA-1 Hashing Algorithm for Microsoft Root Certificate Program - Version: 2.0
[14 Mar 2017 11:00am]

» 4010983 - Vulnerability in ASP.NET Core MVC 1.1.0 Could Allow Denial of Service - Version: 1.0
[27 Jan 2017 11:00am]

» 3214296 - Vulnerabilities in Identity Model Extensions Token Signing Verification Could Allow Elevation of Privilege - Version: 1.0
[10 Jan 2017 11:00am]

» 3181759 - Vulnerabilities in ASP.NET Core View Components Could Allow Elevation of Privilege - Version: 1.0
[13 Sep 2016 11:00am]

» 3174644 - Updated Support for Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange - Version: 1.0
[13 Sep 2016 11:00am]

» 3179528 - Update for Kernel Mode Blacklist - Version: 1.0
[09 Aug 2016 11:00am]

» 2880823 - Deprecation of SHA-1 Hashing Algorithm for Microsoft Root Certificate Program - Version: 2.0
[18 May 2016 11:00am]

» 3155527 - Update to Cipher Suites for FalseStart - Version: 1.0
[10 May 2016 11:00am]

» 3152550 - Update to Improve Wireless Mouse Input Filtering - Version: 1.1
[22 Apr 2016 11:00am]

» 3137909 - Vulnerabilities in ASP.NET Templates Could Allow Tampering - Version: 1.1
[10 Feb 2016 11:00am]

» 2871997 - Update to Improve Credentials Protection and Management - Version: 5.0
[09 Feb 2016 11:00am]

» 3118753 - Updates for ActiveX Kill Bits 3118753 - Version: 1.0
[12 Jan 2016 11:00am]

» 3109853 - Update to Improve TLS Session Resumption Interoperability - Version: 1.0
[12 Jan 2016 11:00am]

» 2755801 - Update for Vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge - Version: 53.0
[05 Jan 2016 11:00am]

» 3057154 - Update to Harden Use of DES Encryption - Version: 1.1
[08 Dec 2015 11:00am]

***


***
Network World Security

» Customers roast Microsoft over security bulletins' demise
[24 Apr 2017 03:57pm]

» 7 patch management practices guaranteed to help protect your data
[24 Apr 2017 02:59pm]

» More Windows PCs infected with NSA backdoor DoublePulsar
[24 Apr 2017 08:50am]

» Bring Your Own Authentication is upending online security practices
[24 Apr 2017 08:37am]

» Fight firewall sprawl with AlgoSec, Tufin, Skybox suites
[10 Apr 2017 04:32am]

» Review: Canary Flex security camera lives up to its name
[24 Mar 2017 07:01am]

» Smackdown: Office 365 vs. G Suite management
[16 Mar 2017 07:01am]

» Zix wins 5-vendor email encryption shootout
[13 Mar 2017 04:00am]

» Review: vArmour flips security on its head
[06 Mar 2017 03:50am]

» 5 open source security tools too good to ignore
[21 Feb 2017 07:12am]

» Review: Samsung SmartCam PT network camera
[15 Feb 2017 07:00am]

» Review: Arlo Pro cameras offer true flexibility for home security
[09 Feb 2017 07:01am]

» Face-off: Oracle vs. CA for identity management
[26 Jan 2017 10:30am]

» 7 patch management practices guaranteed to help protect your data
[24 Apr 2017 02:59pm]

» More Windows PCs infected with NSA backdoor DoublePulsar
[24 Apr 2017 08:50am]

***


More IT Security
News Feeds
More Sponsors

Advertise on this site
RSS Feeds
Our news can be syndicated by using these rss feeds.
rss1.0
rss2.0
rdf
Welcome
Username:

Password:




Remember me

[ ]

NIST.org is in no way connected to the U.S. government site NIST.gov

This site is © John Herron, CISSP. All Rights Reserved.

Please visit daily to stay up to date on all your IT Security compliance issues.

http://www.nist.org -
Hosted by BlueHost. We've never had a better hosting company.
{THEMEDISCLAIMER}