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  • It's time to upgrade to TLS 1.3 already, says CDN engineer
    Peter Sayer

    Businesses dragging their heels over rolling out TLS 1.2 on their website might have an excuse to delay a little longer: Version 1.3 of the TLS (Transport Layer Security) encryption protocol will be finalized later this year, and early deployments of it are already under way.

    TLS, the successor to SSL, is used to negotiate secure connections to web or mail servers, encrypting data on the move.

    Six years in the making, TLS 1.2 added new, stronger encryption options -- but retained all the older, weaker encryption schemes that had gone before in the name of backward compatibility. Unfortunately, this meant that someone able to perform a man-in-the-middle attack could often downgrade connections to a weaker encryption system without the user being aware.

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  • 6 things you need to know about virtual private networks
    Lucian Constantin

    A virtual private network is a secure tunnel between two or more computers on the internet, allowing them to access each other as if on a local network. In the past, VPNs were mainly used by companies to securely link remote branches together or connect roaming employees to the office network, but today they're an important service for consumers too, protecting them from attacks when they connect to public wireless networks. Given their importance, here's what you need to know about VPNs:

    VPNs are good for your privacy and security

    Open wireless networks pose a serious risk to users, because attackers sitting on the same networks can use various techniques to sniff web traffic and even hijack accounts on websites that don't use the HTTPS security protocol. In addition, some Wi-Fi network operators intentionally inject ads into web traffic, and these could lead to unwanted tracking.

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  • IDG Contributor Network: The fight to defend the Internet of Things
    Raj Talluri

    The Internet has entered a new chapter called the Internet of Things (IoT). It follows the fixed-Internet era characterized by connected PCs and laptops through the 1990s, and builds on the mobile-Internet era spearheaded by the proliferation of smartphones during the first two decades of this century. This new chapter has a new set of challenges and opportunities because it involves a broader diversity of devices — ranging from connected light bulbs, smart gas meters and smart speakers, to IP monitoring cameras, smart watches, drones, and robots. And while the connectivity and compute requirements of these IoT devices vary widely, they all have a common need: strong security.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Banks and Fed sites score as least trustworthy in OTA 2017 security and privacy audit
    Ms. Smith

    We frequently hear that we can’t have privacy and security; sadly, that is often still the case as an audit of over 1,000 top websites analyzed for security and privacy practices showed an alarming trend for the third year in a row. The Online Trust Alliance said, “Sites either qualify for the Honor Roll or fail the Audit. In other words, sites increasingly either take privacy and security seriously and do well in the Audit, or lag the industry significantly in one or more critical areas.”

    There is good news and bad news coming out of the audit (pdf). The good news is that 52 percent of websites, the highest percent in nine years of the annual analysis, qualified for the OTA’s Honor Roll. The flipside is that 46 percent of the websites failed the audit; of those, bank did the worst.

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  • Gravityscan, keeping WordPress sites safe
    Mark Gibbs

    If your website, in common with roughly 25% of all websites, is running WordPress then it's pretty much certain that it's being constantly attacked. WordPress is to hackers what raw meat is to jackals because unless sites are assiduously maintained, they quickly become vulnerable to a huge number of exploits.

    The root cause of this vulnerability is WordPress' ecosystem of complex core software augmented by thousands of third party developers whose themes and plugins are often buggy and not quickly (or often, never) updated to fend off known security problems. Add to that many site owners being slow to update their core WordPress installation and you have an enormous and easily discovered collection of irresistible hacking targets.

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  • Network monitoring tools: Features users love and hate
    IT Central Station

    Managing the health of the corporate network will directly affect the productivity of every user of that network. So network administrators need a robust network monitoring tool that helps them manage the network, identify problems before they cause downtime, and quickly resolve issues when something goes wrong.

    Five of the top network monitoring products on the market, according to users in the IT Central Station community, are CA Unified Infrastructure Management, SevOne, Microsoft System Center Operations Manager (SCOM), SolarWinds Network Performance Monitor (NPM), and CA Spectrum.

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    (Insider Story)

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  • Fight firewall sprawl with AlgoSec, Tufin, Skybox suites
    John Breeden II

    New and innovative security tools seem to be emerging all the time, but the frontline defense for just about every network in operation today remains the trusty firewall. They aren’t perfect, but if configured correctly and working as intended, firewalls can do a solid job of blocking threats from entering a network, while restricting unauthorized traffic from leaving.

    The problem network administrators face is that as their networks grow, so do the number of firewalls. Large enterprises can find themselves with hundreds or thousands, a mix of old, new and next-gen models, probably from multiple vendors -- sometimes accidentally working against each other. For admins trying to configure firewall rules, the task can quickly become unmanageable.

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    (Insider Story)

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  • Review: Canary Flex security camera lives up to its name
    Keith Shaw

    Canary’s initial foray into the networked home security camera space was very impressive – my colleague David Newman touted its high security settings in the wake of revelations about the general insecurity of these types of devices. The Canary camera was also somewhat large – a cylindrical tower that took up some significant space on your desk, cabinet or shelf.

    The latest camera the company sent me is the Canary Flex, a much smaller unit meant to be more flexible (hence the name) in terms of placement, but also in power options. Like the Arlo Pro camera, the Canary Flex is powered by an internal battery (it’s charged via USB cable and power adapter). This means you can move the Flex to a location inside or outside your home where there’s no power outlet. The Flex comes with wall mounting screws and a 360-degree magnetic stand so you can position the camera in different spots. Additional accessories, such as a plant mount or twist mount (pictured below), offer even more location choices.

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  • Zix wins 5-vendor email encryption shootout
    David Strom

    Email encryption products have made major strides since we last looked at them nearly two years ago. They have gotten easier to use and deploy, thanks to a combination of user interface and encryption key management improvements, and are at the point where encryption can almost be called effortless on the part of the end user.

    Our biggest criticism in 2015 was that the products couldn’t cover multiple use cases, such as when a user switches from reading emails on their smartphone to moving to a webmailer to composing messages on their Outlook desktop client. Fortunately, the products are all doing a better job handling multi-modal email.

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    (Insider Story)

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  • Review: vArmour flips security on its head
    John Breeden II

    Almost every cybersecurity program these days does some sort of scanning, sandboxing or traffic examination to look for anomalies that might indicate the presence of malware. We’ve even reviewed dedicated threat-hunting tools that ferret out malware that’s already active inside a network.

    However, what if there were a different way to approach security? Instead of searching for behaviors that might indicate a threat, what if you could define everything that is allowed within a network? If every process, application and workflow needed to conduct business could be defined, then by default everything outside of those definitions could be flagged as illegal. At the very least, critical programs could be identified and all interactions with them could be tightly defined and monitored. It’s a different way of looking at security, called segmentation.

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    (Insider Story)

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  • 5 open source security tools too good to ignore
    Fahmida Y. Rashid

    Open source is a wonderful thing. A significant chunk of today’s enterprise IT and personal technology depends on open source software. But even while open source software is widely used in networking, operating systems, and virtualization, enterprise security platforms still tend to be proprietary and vendor-locked. Fortunately, that’s changing. 

    If you haven’t been looking to open source to help address your security needs, it’s a shame—you’re missing out on a growing number of freely available tools for protecting your networks, hosts, and data. The best part is, many of these tools come from active projects backed by well-known sources you can trust, such as leading security companies and major cloud operators. And many have been tested in the biggest and most challenging environments you can imagine. 

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  • Review: Samsung SmartCam PT network camera
    Keith Shaw

    The home security camera market has taken a big hit in recent months, becoming the poster child for “bad security behavior” when people talk about the security (or lack thereof) of Internet of Things. Last year’s highly publicized DDoS attack on Dyn highlighted insecure cameras being used as part of a botnet; vulnerabilities were also found in Chinese-based security cameras and at least one Samsung SmartCam product. In the U.S., the FTC filed a complaint against D-Link over claims that their webcams were “secure”.

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  • Review: Arlo Pro cameras offer true flexibility for home security
    Keith Shaw

    Netgear’s Arlo brand of home security, network-connected cameras continues to improve, defeating every real or perceived criticism about the devices with an upgrade or improvement. Want to place in an area where there’s no network cable? Bam! Wi-Fi connection. Need to place in an area where there’s no power outlet? Bam! Battery powered! Don’t like replacing batteries? Bam! Rechargeable batteries and a quick-charge battery adapter.

    The latest version of this system is the Arlo Pro – it’s the most flexible camera system I’ve come across so far. After a few weeks of testing, I’ve determined that anyone who has a problem with this system (or think that it can’t do something) is just a cynical old crank.

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  • 6 things you need to know about virtual private networks
    Lucian Constantin

    A virtual private network is a secure tunnel between two or more computers on the internet, allowing them to access each other as if on a local network. In the past, VPNs were mainly used by companies to securely link remote branches together or connect roaming employees to the office network, but today they're an important service for consumers too, protecting them from attacks when they connect to public wireless networks. Given their importance, here's what you need to know about VPNs:

    VPNs are good for your privacy and security

    Open wireless networks pose a serious risk to users, because attackers sitting on the same networks can use various techniques to sniff web traffic and even hijack accounts on websites that don't use the HTTPS security protocol. In addition, some Wi-Fi network operators intentionally inject ads into web traffic, and these could lead to unwanted tracking.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • IDG Contributor Network: The fight to defend the Internet of Things
    Raj Talluri

    The Internet has entered a new chapter called the Internet of Things (IoT). It follows the fixed-Internet era characterized by connected PCs and laptops through the 1990s, and builds on the mobile-Internet era spearheaded by the proliferation of smartphones during the first two decades of this century. This new chapter has a new set of challenges and opportunities because it involves a broader diversity of devices — ranging from connected light bulbs, smart gas meters and smart speakers, to IP monitoring cameras, smart watches, drones, and robots. And while the connectivity and compute requirements of these IoT devices vary widely, they all have a common need: strong security.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • Banks and Fed sites score as least trustworthy in OTA 2017 security and privacy audit
    Ms. Smith

    We frequently hear that we can’t have privacy and security; sadly, that is often still the case as an audit of over 1,000 top websites analyzed for security and privacy practices showed an alarming trend for the third year in a row. The Online Trust Alliance said, “Sites either qualify for the Honor Roll or fail the Audit. In other words, sites increasingly either take privacy and security seriously and do well in the Audit, or lag the industry significantly in one or more critical areas.”

    There is good news and bad news coming out of the audit (pdf). The good news is that 52 percent of websites, the highest percent in nine years of the annual analysis, qualified for the OTA’s Honor Roll. The flipside is that 46 percent of the websites failed the audit; of those, bank did the worst.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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  • EU wants to ease commercial drone use with future flight rules
    Peter Sayer

    The European Commission wants to make it easier for lightweight drones to fly autonomously in European airspace -- with logistics, inspection services and agricultural businesses set to benefit.

    Last Friday, the Commission unveiled a plan to improve the safety of drones flying at low altitude.

    It wants to introduce a consistent set of rules across the EU for flying drones in "U-space," its name for regulated airspace under 150 meters in altitude.

    Simpler regulations will be welcomed by multinational businesses such as gas giant Engie, which is developing drones for tasks such as pipeline or building inspection or for cleaning the insulators on high-voltage overhead power lines.

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  • 198 million American voter records found unprotected on the internet
    Ms. Smith

    You’d think if someone had amassed personal information on nearly every registered US voter, and stored that information on an Amazon S3 storage bucket, that it would at least be protected with a password. But thanks to a misconfigured server, personal data of 198 million Americans voters could be downloaded by anyone who happened across it. It is believed to be the largest leak of voter records to have ever occurred anywhere in the world.

    That giant oops caused by Deep Root Analytics, a data analytics firm contracted to compile the information for the Republican National Committee, contained names, birthdates, home and mailing addresses, phone numbers, party affiliations, suspected ethnicities and religions, as well as analytics on who people would likely vote for and their stance on hot-button issues such as gun control and abortion.

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  • Reckless abuse (again) of surveillance spyware that was sold to governments
    Ms. Smith

    We keep seeing a common theme when it comes to spyware sold exclusively to governments, surveillance spyware which is marketed as lawful tools to help governments fight crime and terrorism; those remote intrusion solutions are increasingly used to spy on people who the governments consider to be a threat because those people are revealing the truth to the public. The latest example comes from Mexico, showing how powerful spyware was used to target journalists investigating high-level official corruption and human rights defenders investigating government-sponsored human rights abuses.

    The surveillance spyware Pegasus (pdf), sold by the Israel-based NSO Group, is meant to remotely take complete control of mobile phones. While this isn’t the first time the stealthy Pegasus has been abused by governments for purposes other than preventing and investigating crimes, Citizen Lab said it is the first time a minor has been targeted with infection attempts using governmental spyware. Why target a kid? To spy on his mother.

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  • Hackers attacked 4 Florida school districts, allegedly hoped to hack voting systems
    Ms. Smith

    We’ve heard a lot about Russians attackers attempting to hack the US election, but another hacking group also allegedly wanted to interfere with the election; they attempted to pivot from compromised school districts to state voting systems.

    The Miami Herald reported that MoRo, a group of hackers based in Morocco, penetrated “at least four Florida school district networks” and purportedly searched for a way “to slip into other sensitive government systems, including state voting systems.”

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  • IDG Contributor Network: When SD-WAN is more than SD-WAN
    Steve Garson

    As the SD-WAN market has matured, one thing has become very clear: SD-WAN will not exist on its own. The technology is merging with other networking technologies, ultimately becoming a feature of a much larger bundle. While it may be too early to say what this “new thing” will be, the rough contours are emerging.

    Predominantly, we’re seeing security and SD-WANs merge. Just consider some of the activity:

    • Velocloud recently announced its SD-WAN Security Technology Partner Program to integrate with other security vendor’s products.
    • Viptela (soon to be Cisco), Silver Peak, Velocloud and others have long (well, long in the SD-WAN sense) touted integration with security vendors using service chaining.
    • Cato Networks built its own integrated security and networking stack in the cloud.
    • Masergy bundles SD-WAN (Silver Peak and its own technology) with third-party security services in the cloud.

    But what’s missing in many of these integrated offerings is the completeness of the edge solution. Companies need more than just an SD-WAN in branch offices. They need firewall, IPS, anti-malware, URL filtering and anti-virus for security. Internally, networking calls for Active Directory, DHCP, DNS, and print services. Externally, the edge may need WAN optimization, bandwidth management, QOS, traffic balancing, and, yes, SD-WAN.

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  • DHS and FBI issue alert about North Korean 'Hidden Cobra' hackers
    Ms. Smith

    Watch out for attacks by Hidden Cobra, aka North Korean government hackers, the DHS and the FBI warned in a joint technical alert. The US government didn’t tiptoe around the issue, instead pointing the finger of blame at North Korea for a series of cyberattacks dating back to 2009.

    Who the heck is Hidden Cobra? You probably already know about these cyber actors who are usually referred to as the Lazarus Group. Back in 2014 when the hackers targeted Sony Pictures Entertainment, the group was publicly referring to itself as Guardians of the Peace.

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  • Crash Override: Malware that took down a power grid may have been a test run
    Ms. Smith

    Two security firms have released reports about the malware which was used in the December 2016 Ukraine power outage, warning that the partial power outage in Kiev may have been test run; the malware could be leveraged against other countries, including the US.

    The malware, dubbed Crash Override in the Dragos report (pdf) and Industroyer in the ESET report (pdf), has nothing to do with espionage and everything to do with cyber-sabotage.

    Crash Override, Dragos says, “is the first ever malware framework designed and deployed to attack electric grids.” It could be “leveraged at multiple sites simultaneously.” Dragos founder Robert M. Lee told Reuters, “The malware is capable of causing outages of up to a few days in portions of a nation's grid, but is not potent enough to bring down a country's entire grid.”

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  • South Korean web hosting company infected by Erebus ransomware
    Ms. Smith

    Nayana, a web hosting company in South Korea, suffered a ransomware attack over the weekend which resulted in more than a hundred Linux servers and thousands of websites being infected with Erebus ransomware. The initial ransom amount was astronomically high.

    Yesterday, I came across the news that a South Korean web hosting company had been infected by ransomware, but it was extremely short on details. The ransomware was Erebus; the attack occurred on Saturday and thousands of sites were reportedly infected.

    Today, Aju Business Daily provided more details. Nayana reportedly said 153 of its Linux servers were infected with Erebus. In turn, about 3,400 sites on the web hosting company’s servers were also infected.

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  • Witcher 3 developers won't bow to extortion for stolen Cyberpunk 2077 files
    Ms. Smith

    With E3 (Electronic Entertainment Expo) starting this week, we can expect a flood of gaming news. It remains to be seen if the person or people trying to extort Polish game developer CD Projekt Red will choose this week to leak stolen Cyberpunk 2077 game files.

    Instead of staying quiet about an extortion attempt, CD Projekt Red, the developers behind The Witcher 3, got out ahead of any potential leak by tweeting:

    An unidentified individual or individuals have just informed us they are in possession of a few internal files belonging to CD PROJEKT RED. Among them are documents connected to early designs for the upcoming game, Cyberpunk 2077.

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  • 24% off Resqme Keychain Car Escape Tool 2-Pack - Deal Alert
    DealPost Team

    Made in the USA and originally developed for first responders, this 2-in-1 safety and survival tool is amazingly powerful despite its mini size. A fierce but safe spring loaded stainless steel spike allows the vehicle occupant to easily break side windows, and a carefully concealed stainless steel razor blade slices through a jammed seat belt to prevent vehicular entrapment. resqme is small enough to keep on your keychain, or clip it to your visor where it will always be at arm's reach. The resqme vehicle escape tool averages 4.5 out of 5 stars on Amazon from over 2,600 reviewers (read reviews). The typical list price on a 2-pack is $19.95, but with this 24% discount you can pick them up for $15.25. See this deal on Amazon.

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  • IDG Contributor Network: Top 5 InfoSec concerns for 2017
    Gene Richardson

    Cloudbleed, WannaCry, ransomware, hackers. Each and every day, it seems, the tech community wakes up to news of another attack on data security and privacy. As IT professionals, we spend our days working to the best of our knowledge and ability to keep company information secure. Some days, however, when news of new attacks hit, it can feel like we’ll never get ahead. As soon as we learn one method of protection, the hackers have invented a new workaround.

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  • NSA's EthernalBlue exploit ported to Windows 10
    Ms. Smith

    If you were running Windows 10, then you didn’t need to worry about your box being hit with the leaked NSA EternalBlue exploit; but things change and now researchers have ported EternalBlue to Windows 10.

    After the WannaCry ransomware attack, some defenders focused on building detection rules to protect against the DoublePulsar backdoor implant; but beware as RiskSense researchers completely removed DoublePulsar. They warned that DoublePulsar is a “red herring for defenders to focus on, as stealthier payload mechanisms can be crafted.”

    While they are not revealing all the details about the exploit chain so attackers can jump on them, they hope white hat security researchers benefit from the technical overview of the exploit process “so that new generic and targeted techniques can be developed to prevent attacks.”

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  • Mingis on Tech: The alphabet soup of mobile device management

    Do you know your MDM from MAM and EMM? It's all about BYOD, and how companies can keep data safe while making it easier for workers to be productive with their own devices.

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  • What Extreme’s string of networking acquisitions means for enterprises
    Michael Cooney,

    Brandon Butler

    Extreme Network’s recent string of acquisitions – including it’s recent $100 million auction-buy of Avaya’s networking business, it’s purchase of Brocade’s Ethernet IP networking assets and its purchase of wireless vendor Zebra Technologies last year – should cause enterprise end users to potentially rethink their network infrastructure buying decisions when it comes time for their next hardware refresh, according to Forrester analyst Andre Kindness.

    Kindness says in the immediate short term, there are not likely to be any major changes to offerings from these vendors; all current Avaya and Brocade networking gear will still be supported. But given Extreme’s acquisition spree, it’s expected there will be some consolidation and blending of products over the medium and long-term. “As with anything, it will take some time to reconcile the moves and figure out the new direction,” says Kindness.

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  • Researchers find gaps in IoT security
    Steven Max Patterson

    Researchers from the University of Michigan and Stony Brook University published a paper explaining a novel approach to IoT security challenges (pdf). The researchers pose the question:

     “What are the new intellectual challenges in the science of security when we talk about the Internet of Things, and what problems can we solve using currently known security techniques?”

    This research approach is very accessible because it uses existing categories and concepts by comparing security methods developed for smartphones, PCs and the cloud to identify the gaps and challenges to IoT security. The IoT stack is defined with the familiar layers:

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  • IDG Contributor Network: Learn What NIST’s Cybersecurity Framework Can Do For You
    Michelle Drolet

    The meteoric rise of cybercrime has caught many organizations unawares. Malware has spread from PCs to smartphones, phishing scams have grown more sophisticated, and ransomware is running rampant.

    You can hire hackers and botnets, or buy cybercrime software, complete with technical support, all too easily. The rapidly expanding Internet of Things is woefully insecure, creating many more access points that can be exploited by hackers.

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  • Feds charge NSA contractor for leaking Top Secret report about Russia hacking election
    Ms. Smith

    Russian military intelligence hackers, believed to be working within the Russian General Staff Main Intelligence Directorate (GRU), tried to break into VR Systems, a company that sells voting registration equipment which was used in the 2016 election. That’s what the NSA determined, according to a classified intelligence report which was leaked to The Intercept.

    An hour after The Intercept published the NSA document, the Justice Department announced charges against Reality Leigh Winner, a 25-year-old intelligence contractor working for Pluribus International Corporation in Georgia. She had only been working as a Pluribus contractor since Feb. 13. Winner, accused of “removing classified material from a government facility and mailing it to a news outlet,” has been charged with Espionage Act.

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  • Armis wants to resolve the IoT security issue
    Ben Kepes

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is a big deal. A really big one.

    There are approximately 8 billion connected devices on the market today, collectively accounting for 50 percent of internet traffic. And that is but a taste of the future—the number of devices is anticipated to increase 150 percent in the next three years. And where growth like that is predicted, every man and his dog is keen to grab market share. The security for IoT space is no different.

    + Also on Network World: A lack of IoT security is scaring the heck out of everybody +

    There are some justified reasons why security in this new IoT context will be different. Connected devices (e.g., laptops, webcams, HVAC systems, etc.) are designed to connect wirelessly, without corporate oversight or control. This creates a dynamic, ever-expanding matrix of connections that not only boosts employee productivity and business efficiency, but simultaneously flies under the radar of security.

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  • 8 ways to manage an internet or security crisis
    Jennifer Lonoff Schiff

    Your business is hit with a ransomware attack. Or your ecommerce site crashes. Your legacy system stops working. Or maybe your latest software release has a major bug. These are just some of the problems that ecommerce, technology and other companies experience at one time or another.

    The issue is not if a problem – or crisis – occurs, but how your company handles it when it does. Manage the problem poorly, you risk losing customers, or worse. Handle a crisis promptly and professionally, you can fend off a public relations disaster and might even gain new customers.

    So what steps can businesses take to mitigate and effectively manage an IT-related crisis? Here are eight suggestions.

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  • Incident response is like tracking down a perpetrator
    Ryan Francis
    What is incident response?
    1 incident response police tape crime death

    Image by Thinkstock

    Incident response is like investigating a real burglary. You look for evidence of the intruder at the crime scene, find his targets and his getaway car, and repair any holes. Discover any cuts in your chain link fence. Take a few steps back for more perspective. Find the intruder’s targets. What assets are near the compromised fence? Investigate in both directions to find the intruder's target and getaway car. Fix the fence. Resolve any issues and patch vulnerabilities.

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  • 6 things you need to know about IoT security
    Ryan Francis
    Security, trust and data integrity
    IoT security

    Image by Thinkstock

    The emergence of IoT is altering our personal technology security paradigm and is a game-changer in customer/business interaction, in part due to the wide scope of available data and sheer number of devices collecting this data. McKinsey & Company estimates the IoT ecosystem will generate $6 trillion in value by 2025. Successful IoT offerings rely on the perception of benefit they can deliver to businesses and consumers while creating a proportionate foundation of security, trust, and data integrity. There are important ways that IoT technology can reduce data security risk while improving customer experience in a connected world.

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  • Pitfalls of identity access management
    Ryan Francis
    Tracking
    identity access management

    Image by Thinkstock

    It is easy to overlook identity access management as static infrastructure in the background, and that's the chief problem: Too few organizations treat IAM as the crucial, secure connective tissue between businesses' multiplying employees, contractors, apps, business partners and service providers. Aaron Perry, president at Focal Point Data Risk, runs through some of IAM’s pitfalls.

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  • How to strike ransomware out
    Ryan Francis
    Swing and a miss
    ransomware

    Image by Victor Grigas

    Most businesses are ill prepared to handle a ransomware attack. In fact, according to a new study released by Carbonite, 68 percent of survey respondents believe their company is “very vulnerable” or “vulnerable” to a ransomware attack. Respondents stated that if their company didn’t pay ransom, it was because they had a full and accurate backup. Without backup, they have no other way to get their most valuable asset back.

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  • 10 ways to achieve ROI on a network solution
    Ryan Francis
    Measuring ROI
    1 measure roi

    Image by Thinkstock

    With the advent of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), WLAN network access to customers and visitors and virtualized systems, the demand for IP addresses has exploded. Small companies might have to manage more than 1,000 IP addresses and it is not unusual for larger companies to have 10,000 or more spread across many locations. Setting up and protecting the network infrastructure is a major challenge and needs to be even more sophisticated and dynamic than ever before.

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  • What to ask when selecting application security solutions
    Ryan Francis
    Buying decisions
    application security solutions

    Image by Thinkstock

    There are many factors to consider when making an application security purchasing decision, and the pressure is on organizations now more than ever to improve their security risk management preparedness. In fact, more than 80 percent of security attacks target software applications, with application vulnerabilities as the No.1 cyber-attack target. Organizations need a comprehensive application security toolkit to stay secure throughout the product lifecycle, and need to address key questions that can help them determine the right tools to address security risks.

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  • How to minimize the risks of phishing scams

    Employees are often the weakest link in your company's security chain. But with a little knowledge and foresight you can mitigate the risks. In this video, CIO.com senior writer Sharon Florentine explains the anatomy of a phishing scam and how you and your workers can avoid becoming a victim.

    click to view

  • What's in the fine print of your disaster recovery vendor agreement?
    Ryan Francis
    Sign on the bottom line
    disaster recovery vendor agreement

    Image by Thinkstock

    Disaster-recovery solutions require several complex, moving parts coordinated between your production site and the recovery site. Service-level agreements are ultimately the most accurate way to determine where responsibility is held for disaster-recovery process and execution. It’s important to have SLA documentation around these critical aspects of recovery so that customers have commitments from their vendor. It’s also important that a service provider’s agreements contain service-credit backed SLAs for additional accountability. When considering DRaaS vendors, ask your potential partner how far they are willing to go in protecting your business and your data, and if these promises will be reimbursable if not met. Bluelock's Brandon Jeffress reviews what is essential to be in an ironclad SLA.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

  • How to prevent your mobile app from getting hacked
    Ryan Francis
    Trivial matter?
    1 app hacked

    Image by Steve Traynor/IDG

    The average user has around 26 to 55 applications downloaded to his smartphone device. Most likely, you have entertainment and gaming apps, a banking app, a few social media apps, fitness apps, and eCommerce apps to shop at your favorite stores.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



    click to view

| Date published: Sat, 24 Jun 2017 13:34:16 -0700
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Headlines

»CVE-2012-6706
A VMSF_DELTA memory corruption was discovered in unrar before 5.5.5, as used in Sophos Anti-Virus Th ...
»CVE-2014-9962 (android)
In all Android releases from CAF using the Linux kernel, a vulnerability exists in the parsing of a ...
»CVE-2014-9963 (android)
In all Android releases from CAF using the Linux kernel, a buffer overflow vulnerability exists in W ...
»CVE-2014-9964 (android)
In all Android releases from CAF using the Linux kernel, an integer overflow vulnerability exists in ...
»CVE-2014-9965 (android)
In all Android releases from CAF using the Linux kernel, a vulnerability exists in the parsing of an ...
»CVE-2014-9966 (android)
In all Android releases from CAF using the Linux kernel, a Time-of-check Time-of-use (TOCTOU) Race C ...
»CVE-2014-9967 (android)
In all Android releases from CAF using the Linux kernel, an untrusted pointer dereference vulnerabil ...
»CVE-2015-2251 (oceanstor_uds_firmware)
The DeviceManager in Huawei OceanStor UDS devices with software before V100R002C01SPC102 might allow ...
»CVE-2015-2252 (oceanstor_uds_firmware)
Huawei OceanStor UDS devices with software before V100R002C01SPC102 might allow remote attackers to ...
»CVE-2015-2253 (oceanstor_uds_firmware)
The XML interface in Huawei OceanStor UDS devices with software before V100R002C01SPC102 allows remo ...
»CVE-2015-2692 (adblock)
AdBlock before 2.21 allows remote attackers to block arbitrary resources on arbitrary websites and t ...
»CVE-2015-2800 (s5300_firmware, s5700_firmware, s6300_firmware, s6700_firmware, s7700_firmware, s9300_firmware, s9700_firmware)
The user authentication module in Huawei Campus switches S5700, S5300, S6300, and S6700 with softwar ...
»CVE-2015-3254 (thrift)
The client libraries in Apache Thrift before 0.9.3 might allow remote authenticated users to cause a ...
»CVE-2015-3913 (s12700_firmware, s2300_firmware, s2350ei_firmware, s2700_firmware, s2750ei_firmware, s3300_firmware, s3700_firmware, s5300ei_firmware, s5300hi_firmware, s5300li_firmware, s5300si_firmware, s5700ei_firmware, s5700hi_firmware, s5700li_firmware, s5700si_firmware, s5710hi_firmware, s5720hi_firmware, s6300ei_firmware, s6700ei_firmware, s7700_firmware, s9300_firmware, s9700_firmware)
The IP stack in multiple Huawei Campus series switch models allows remote attackers to cause a denia ...
»CVE-2015-9020 (android)
In all Android releases from CAF using the Linux kernel, an untrusted pointer dereference vulnerabil ...


Date published: 2017-06-24T18:00:30Z
Details

»FTC Releases Alert on Tech-Support Scams
Original release date: June 23, 2017 The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has released an alert ...
»IC3 Issues Internet Crime Report for 2016
Original release date: June 21, 2017 | Last revised: June 23, 2017 The Internet Crime Complai ...
»Drupal Releases Security Updates
Original release date: June 21, 2017 Drupal has released an advisory to address several vulne ...
»Cisco Releases Security Updates
Original release date: June 21, 2017 Cisco has released updates to address several vulnerabil ...
»Mozilla Releases Security Update
Original release date: June 15, 2017 Mozilla has released a security update to address multip ...
»Google Releases Security Updates for Chrome
Original release date: June 15, 2017 Google has released Chrome version 59.0.3071.104 for Win ...
»ISC Releases Security Updates for BIND
Original release date: June 15, 2017 | Last revised: June 16, 2017 The Internet Systems Conso ...
»Microsoft Releases June 2017 Security Updates
Original release date: June 13, 2017 Microsoft has released updates to address vulnerabilitie ...
»Mozilla Releases Security Updates
Original release date: June 13, 2017 Mozilla has released security updates to address multipl ...
»Adobe Releases Security Updates
Original release date: June 13, 2017 Adobe has released security updates to address vulnerabi ...


Date published: not known
Details

»VB2016 paper: Steam stealers: it's all fun and games until someone's account gets hijacked
Last year, Kaspersky Lab researcher Santiago Pontiroli and PwC's Ba ...
»Research paper shows it may be possible to distinguish malware traffic using TLS
Researchers at Cisco have published a paper describing how it may b ...
»Is CVE-2017-0199 the new CVE-2012-0158?
After five years of exploitation in a wide variety of attacks, CVE- ...
»Review: BSides London 2017
Virus Bulletin was a proud sponsor of BSides London 2017 - Martijn ...
»VB2017: one of the most international security conferences
It is well known that the problem of cybersecurity is a global one ...
»VB2016 paper: Diving into Pinkslipbot's latest campaign
Qakbot or Qbot, is a banking trojan that makes the news every once ...
»Book review: Spam: A Shadow History of the Internet
VB Editor Martijn Grooten reviews Finn Brunton's book 'Spam: A Shad ...
»Virus Bulletin to sponsor BSides London
Virus Bulletin is proud to be a Silver sponsor of BSides London nex ...
»VB2016 video: Last-minute paper: Malicious proxy auto-configs: an easy way to harvest banking credentials
In a VB2016 last-minute presentation, Jaromír Horejší and Jan Širme ...


Date published: not known
Details
Main Menu
· Home
Current Security News
 
US-CERT Current Activity

» FTC Releases Alert on Tech-Support Scams
[23 Jun 2017 02:09pm]

» IC3 Issues Internet Crime Report for 2016
[21 Jun 2017 04:40pm]

» Drupal Releases Security Updates
[21 Jun 2017 03:30pm]

» Cisco Releases Security Updates
[21 Jun 2017 01:45pm]

» Mozilla Releases Security Update
[15 Jun 2017 07:29pm]

» Google Releases Security Updates for Chrome
[15 Jun 2017 07:27pm]

» ISC Releases Security Updates for BIND
[14 Jun 2017 11:26pm]

» Microsoft Releases June 2017 Security Updates
[13 Jun 2017 02:56pm]

» Mozilla Releases Security Updates
[13 Jun 2017 02:52pm]

» Adobe Releases Security Updates
[13 Jun 2017 02:51pm]

***
US-CERT Alerts

» TA17-164A: HIDDEN COBRA – North Korea’s DDoS Botnet Infrastructure
[13 Jun 2017 09:45am]

» TA17-163A: CrashOverride Malware
[12 Jun 2017 03:44pm]

» TA17-156A: Reducing the Risk of SNMP Abuse
[05 Jun 2017 06:11pm]

» TA17-132A: Indicators Associated With WannaCry Ransomware
[12 May 2017 07:36pm]

» TA17-117A: Intrusions Affecting Multiple Victims Across Multiple Sectors
[27 Apr 2017 04:50pm]

» TA17-075A: HTTPS Interception Weakens TLS Security
[16 Mar 2017 06:40am]

» TA16-336A: Avalanche (crimeware-as-a-service infrastructure)
[30 Nov 2016 10:00pm]

» TA16-288A: Heightened DDoS Threat Posed by Mirai and Other Botnets
[14 Oct 2016 05:59pm]

» TA16-250A: The Increasing Threat to Network Infrastructure Devices and Recommended Mitigations
[06 Sep 2016 04:29pm]

» TA16-187A: Symantec and Norton Security Products Contain Critical Vulnerabilities
[05 Jul 2016 08:50am]

***
Computerworld Security

» 8 reasons why you should strengthen your iOS passcode today
[23 Jun 2017 07:57am]

» How IT should prep for Apple's public OS betas
[22 Jun 2017 10:22am]

» Not the disaster recovery we were expecting
[22 Jun 2017 04:00am]

» Q&A: AppDynamics CIO sees SaaS as the future of mobile management
[21 Jun 2017 04:11am]

» 4 ways blockchain is the new business collaboration tool
[20 Jun 2017 03:58pm]

» 2 handy yet hidden Chromebook security features
[20 Jun 2017 10:04am]

» The Microsoft security hole at the heart of Russian election hacking
[20 Jun 2017 09:29am]

» The price of security is eternal phone calls
[16 Jun 2017 04:00am]

» Rogue cell phone surveillance gives rise to mobile threat defense
[15 Jun 2017 04:01am]

» Microsoft resurrects Windows XP patches for second month straight
[13 Jun 2017 04:22pm]

» What Microsoft owes customers, and answers to other 'WannaCry' questions
[12 Jun 2017 01:57pm]

» For real Windows 10 privacy, you need the China Government Edition
[12 Jun 2017 12:19pm]

» IDG Contributor Network: Can Dell change endpoint security?
[12 Jun 2017 10:15am]

» 24% off Resqme Keychain Car Escape Tool 2-Pack - Deal Alert
[09 Jun 2017 07:42am]

» Blockchain integration turns ERP into a collaboration platform
[09 Jun 2017 04:06am]

***
Microsoft Security Advisories

» 4025685 - Guidance related to June 2017 security update release - Version: 1.0
[13 Jun 2017 11:00am]

» 4022345 - Identifying and correcting failure of Windows Update client to receive updates - Version: 1.3
[12 May 2017 11:00am]

» 4022344 - Security Update for Microsoft Malware Protection Engine - Version: 1.2
[12 May 2017 11:00am]

» 4021279 - Vulnerabilities in .NET Core, ASP.NET Core Could Allow Elevation of Privilege - Version: 1.1
[10 May 2017 11:00am]

» 4010323 - Deprecation of SHA-1 for SSL/TLS Certificates in Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer 11 - Version: 1.0
[09 May 2017 11:00am]

» 3123479 - SHA-1 Hashing Algorithm for Microsoft Root Certificate Program - Version: 2.0
[14 Mar 2017 11:00am]

» 4010983 - Vulnerability in ASP.NET Core MVC 1.1.0 Could Allow Denial of Service - Version: 1.0
[27 Jan 2017 11:00am]

» 3214296 - Vulnerabilities in Identity Model Extensions Token Signing Verification Could Allow Elevation of Privilege - Version: 1.0
[10 Jan 2017 11:00am]

» 3181759 - Vulnerabilities in ASP.NET Core View Components Could Allow Elevation of Privilege - Version: 1.0
[13 Sep 2016 11:00am]

» 3174644 - Updated Support for Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange - Version: 1.0
[13 Sep 2016 11:00am]

» 3179528 - Update for Kernel Mode Blacklist - Version: 1.0
[09 Aug 2016 11:00am]

» 2880823 - Deprecation of SHA-1 Hashing Algorithm for Microsoft Root Certificate Program - Version: 2.0
[18 May 2016 11:00am]

» 3155527 - Update to Cipher Suites for FalseStart - Version: 1.0
[10 May 2016 11:00am]

» 3152550 - Update to Improve Wireless Mouse Input Filtering - Version: 1.1
[22 Apr 2016 11:00am]

» 3137909 - Vulnerabilities in ASP.NET Templates Could Allow Tampering - Version: 1.1
[10 Feb 2016 11:00am]

***


***
Network World Security

» It's time to upgrade to TLS 1.3 already, says CDN engineer
[23 Jun 2017 05:03am]

» 6 things you need to know about virtual private networks
[22 Jun 2017 02:35pm]

» IDG Contributor Network: The fight to defend the Internet of Things
[22 Jun 2017 09:00am]

» Banks and Fed sites score as least trustworthy in OTA 2017 security and privacy audit
[21 Jun 2017 07:35am]

» Gravityscan, keeping WordPress sites safe
[24 May 2017 02:34pm]

» Network monitoring tools: Features users love and hate
[01 May 2017 04:51am]

» Fight firewall sprawl with AlgoSec, Tufin, Skybox suites
[10 Apr 2017 04:32am]

» Review: Canary Flex security camera lives up to its name
[24 Mar 2017 07:01am]

» Zix wins 5-vendor email encryption shootout
[13 Mar 2017 04:00am]

» Review: vArmour flips security on its head
[06 Mar 2017 03:50am]

» 5 open source security tools too good to ignore
[21 Feb 2017 07:12am]

» Review: Samsung SmartCam PT network camera
[15 Feb 2017 07:00am]

» Review: Arlo Pro cameras offer true flexibility for home security
[09 Feb 2017 07:01am]

» 6 things you need to know about virtual private networks
[22 Jun 2017 02:35pm]

» IDG Contributor Network: The fight to defend the Internet of Things
[22 Jun 2017 09:00am]

***


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